Skip to content ↓
In this section...

Our SEND information report contributing to the Local Offer.

Homefield Primary School’s contribution to the Local Offer for SEN 2017/18
SEN Information Report
2017-2018
Part of the Norfolk Local Offer for Learners with SEN

Introduction

Welcome to our SEN information report which is part of the Norfolk Local Offer for learners with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEN-D). We have a duty to publish our policy for pupils with SEN-D. The information published will be updated annually and is very much a working document that can be added to at various points throughout the year.  The required information is set out in the SEN-D Code of Practice (C.O.P) January 2015 which can be found on our website.

At Homefield Primary School we are committed to working together with all members of our school community. We would welcome your feedback and future involvement in the co-production of our offer, so please do contact us. 

The best people to contact this year are:

Miss Penny Studley (Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator-SENCO)

Mrs Donna Bridge (SEND Governor)

Mr Bradley Young (Headteacher)

Mrs Paula Clarke (Pastoral Mentor)

Overview of our approach to learners with SEN-D.

At Homefield Primary School we believe in participation for all, giving all pupils the opportunity to shine. We want all adults and children to participate in learning and we celebrate all members of our community. We have an inclusive culture at our school and we aim to be responsive to the diversity of children’s backgrounds, interests, skills, experience and knowledge. 

We value high quality teaching for all learners and actively monitor teaching and learning within the school.

We aim to create a learning environment which is flexible enough to meet the needs of all members of our school community. We monitor progress of all learners, and staff continually assess, ensuring that learning is taking place.

The C.O.P considers the areas of SEN-d under four broad areas:

  1. Communication and interaction

  2. Cognition and learning

  3. Social, emotional and mental health difficulties

  4. Sensory and/or physical

1.How do we identify and assess children with SEN-D?

At different times in their school career a child or young person may have a special educational/additional need.

The Code of Practice defines SEN as described below:

A child or young person has SEN if they have a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special educational provision to be made for them. A child of compulsory school age or a young person has a learning difficulty or disability if they:

a) Have significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others the same age: or

b) Have a disability which prevents or hinders them from making use of educational facilities of a kind generally provided for others of the `same age in mainstream schools or mainstream post 16 institutions.”

If a learner is identified as having SEN-D, we will provide provision that is “additional to or different from” the normal differentiated curriculum, intended to overcome the barrier to their learning.

Learners can fall behind for lots of reasons. They may have been absent from school, they may have attended lots of schools and not had a consistent opportunity to learn. They may not speak English very well, or at all, they may be worried about different things that distracts them from learning. At Homefield Primary School we are committed to ensuring that all learners have access to learning opportunities, and for those who are at risk of not learning we will intervene. This does not mean that all vulnerable learners have SEN-D. Only those with a learning difficulty that requires special educational needs provision will be identified as having SEN-D. After consultation with the parent(s) a learner with SEN-D will be added to the school’s SEN-D Register and monitored closely during this period.

Our SEN profile for 2016-17 showed that we had 15.4% of children in our school identified as having SEN-D receiving SEN support, and 0.4% of our SEN pupils had an Education, Health and Care Plan. 

35.8% of our SEN-D children were identified as having their primary need linked to cognition and learning, 25.6% linked to communication and Interaction, 17.9% had social, emotional and mental health difficulties and 20.5% of our SEN children were linked to physical and/or sensory needs.

Class teachers, support staff, parents/ carers and the learner themselves will be the first to notice a difficulty with learning. At Homefield Primary School we ensure the assessment of educational needs directly involves the learner, their parents/ carers and the teacher. The SENCO will also support with the identification of barriers to learning.

Our school tracking system is Classroom Monitor. Teachers use the system day-to-day to track the progress of the pupils in their class. As teachers assess pupils they update the tracking system to reflect the working levels of each learner.  By monitoring this process we hold termly Pupil Progress meetings to discuss any pupils that may not be progressing at the expected rate.  This may lead to a piece of intervention work being carried out within school.  Alternatively, this may identify a learner that needs to be placed on the school’s SEN register for more in-depth monitoring and intervention both internally and externally. 

In our school and cluster we have access to various specialist teams including but not exclusive to:

Educational psychologists,

Learning Advisory Teachers,

Speech and language therapists,

The Newberry Child Development Centre,

Silverwood (CAMHS),

Nelson’s Journey,

Ormiston Trust,

Family Action,

School health,

Family Focus

School 2 School support

We have access to services, universally provided by Norfolk County Council, which are described on the Local Offer website for Norfolk. Click below for the link.

https://www.norfolk.gov.uk/children-and-families/send-local-offer

 

2. How do we support and monitor learners with SEN at Homefield Primary School?

Every teacher is required to adapt the curriculum to ensure access to learning for all children in their class.  We aspire to delivering ‘Quality First Teaching’ to deliver the curriculum.

We employ Teaching/ Learning Support Assistants, who deliver interventions as needed, monitored on the provision map, as coordinated by our SENCO.

Our teachers and Support Assistants will use various strategies to adapt access to the curriculum, this might include using:

 Visual timetables

 Writing frames

 I-pads, laptops or alternative recording devices

 Peer buddy systems

 Positive behaviour reward systems

Each learner identified as having SEN-D, is entitled to support that is additional to or different from a normal differentiated curriculum. The type of support is dependent on the individual learning needs, and is intended to enable access to learning and overcome the barrier to learning identified.

Interventions offered may be run by teachers or teaching assistants, these could focus on phonics, writing, reading, maths, working memory or speech and language, amongst others these may be run in small groups or on a one-to-one basis.

This support is described on a Provision Map.  We are then also able to promote consistent practice across all the schools in our cluster, and where possible share training and expertise to benefit all of our learners.

The Provision Map is also available to be shared with the governors, primarily between the SENCO and SENCO governor at termly meetings, who are able to ensure that we monitor the impact of these interventions on learning throughout the school.

Where progress remains a concern, despite any interventions that are being delivered internally, a learner would then be considered for discussion with other professionals at a termly meeting called SST (School Support Team meeting).  This is a meeting held in school, chaired by the SENCO, where learners’ needs can be discussed with other external professionals, such as an Advisory Learning Support Teacher, an Educational Psychologist and Speech Therapists. Along with our internal Pastoral Mentor we can plan the best course of action for each learner within our school.

Pupils with SEN-D can often benefit from some nurture support.  Within Homefield we have an experienced Pastoral Mentor, Mrs Clarke, who is based in the Sunshine Room at school.  Mrs Clarke provides a haven for learners who need some extra emotional support which in turn benefits their ability to learn back in the classroom.  A learner with SEN-D may benefit from attending a nurture session or a morning ‘Toast Time’ session which again develops social interaction skills.  When a child receives this additional support it is recorded on the school’s Provision Map as a way of building up a bigger picture of how a learner’s needs are being met.  Mrs Clarke is also a fully trained ELSA (Emotional Literacy Support Assistant) offering support to pupils with identified emotional issues.

We offer a drop-in session in school for teachers and support assistants to use when they are seeking some specific and up-to-date ways to support a learner with SEN-D. This is usually offered as needs arise. The drop-in sessions are also offered to parents on a termly basis.  This gives them the opportunity to have an informal consultation with our Learning Advisory Support Teacher for the Cluster.  This is another way of expanding the support channels we offer to our children.  This will often result in a resource being suggested or a particular technique that can be used with immediate effect either at home or at school.

 

2b. How do we find out if this support is effective?

Monitoring progress is an integral part of learning and leadership within Homefield Primary School. Pupils and staff are involved in reviewing the impact of interventions for learners with SEN-D.

We follow the “assess, plan, do, review” model, and aim to ensure that everybody is involved in each step. A baseline is recorded before each intervention, which is used to compare the impact of the provision.

We meet parents of all pupils, including those with SEN-D, at Parent Evenings to discuss and review progress and next steps. If a learner has an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHC plan,) it will also formally reviewed annually.

The SENCO and assessment co-ordinator collate the impact data of interventions to ensure that we are only using interventions that work.

Progress data of all learners is collated by the whole school and monitored by teachers, senior leaders and governors. Our school data is monitored by Norfolk County Council and Ofsted.

3. Wider opportunities for learning

All learners should have the same opportunity to access extra-curricular activities. At Homefield Primary School we are offering a range of additional clubs and activities. A clubs booklet is sent out to all children on a termly basis detailing how to join.  Our extra-curricular activities are offered to all pupils within certain age ranges.  Some clubs are more suitable to the youngest pupils or oldest pupils but the whole age range is endeavoured to be covered where possible. 

As a school, we also offer our pupils a termly enrichment experience.  This gives all pupils the opportunity to try something in school that they may not have tried before.  In the past year we have offered activities including, taekwondo, boxercise, cricket and dance.

As part of the National Curriculum for PE we offer swimming for all of our pupils in Key Stage 2 (years 3 to 6).  This takes place within the school day at the Great Yarmouth High School swimming pool.  

4. How can we prepare children with SEN-D for their next steps?

Transition

This can be transition to a new class, teacher or school. Homefield Primary School is committed to working in partnership with children, families and other providers to ensure that positive transitions occur. Planning for transition is part of our provision for all learners with SEN-D.

Nurture plays a large role at Homefield Primary School.  We have a fully trained member of  staff in the role as Pastoral Mentor (Mrs Clarke) who can help to guide and support our learners at the more vulnerable times of their school life.

 

5. Questions – Have your say

Homefield Primary School is a school for our community. We can shape and develop provision for all our learners, ensuring achievement for all. This SEN-D report declares our annual offer to learners with SEN, but to be effective it needs the views of everybody. So please engage with us to promote the “assess, plan, do, review” model in our provision for SEN.

 

Funding for SEN

Homefield Primary School receives funding directly to the school from the Local Authority to support the needs of learners with SEN.

The Lynn Grove Cluster of schools also receive funding from Norfolk County Council which is distributed as “top up” funding for learners who require support that exceeds that available to the school.

 

Useful links

www.norfolk.gov.uk/SEN

www.parentvoice./info/

www.norfolkparentpartnership.org.uk

www.dfe.gov.uk

www.willowtreelearning.co.uk

www.familyvoice.org.uk/

www.councilfordisabledchildren.org.uk

www.gov.uk/government/publications/send-guide-for-parents-and-carers

www.nasen.org.uk

www.gov.uk/government/publications/send-code-of-practice-0-to-25

http://www.norfolk.gov.uk/Childrens_services/Special_educational_needs_and_disabilities/index.htm